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Example of a Cease & Desist Letter

Today I wrote a “stop using my content” email, called a Cease & Desist letter. I also submitted a complaint to Google, who runs blogspot.com (the service provider of the offender).

If you would like to keep tabs on any unauthorized use of your copyrighted work, please go to https://fairshare.attributor.com/fairshare/homepage and set up an account.

Here is the letter I wrote, with identifying information redacted:

Dear Mr. (Offender),

On your Blogspot.com site, you committed unauthorized use of my original, copyrighted work entitled “Book Review: Twilight Series Is a Primer for the Mormon Religion and Is Boring.” at http://www.purplecar.net/2009/05/04/book-review-twilight-series-is-a-primer-for-the-mormon-religion-and-is-boring/ (hereto referred: the “Work”) in your content on [redacted].blogspot.com at URL http://[redacted].blogspot.com/search/label/[redacted]. You are in violation of my copyright.

I have reserved all rights in the Work, first published in 04 MAY 2009 and have registered copyright therein. Your content, published [date] at [time], entitled “[title]” is essentially identical to the Work and clearly used the Work as its basis. Paragraphs were copied and pasted, using word-for-word copying. For example, the content on your site, in full:

The fact that the Twilight Series is a fantasy series about vampires doesn’t distract from the heavy religiosity throughout the entire 4-book story. The series serves only one purpose: to inculcate teens into a christian morality, preferably Mormon. Let’s not pretend otherwise.

Plus, the repetitive and overly simple writing and transparent plot don’t hold a candle (or a fang) to Harry Potter. Not even close. But that’s plain to anyone who reads the first page. I’ll talk about what must be the appeal at the end of the post. Right now let’s look at the morality messages that pelt you at every turn of the page.

[SPOILER ALERT: Plot is revealed.]

First, we repeatedly see Bella’s and Edward’s “struggle” with staying virgins until they marry. Then they marry at age 18 and 17, respectively, having a child immediately. Plain statements supporting a christian theology, the basic beliefs of the Mormon faith (or, perhaps any conservative christian religion) are clearly outlined in the books. After a while, it becomes clear to the aware reader that the series’ purpose is to spread conservative christian theology and moral beliefs through the teens of the world. The Mormon author of the series, Stephenie Meyer, knew what she was doing.

Unfortunately, the constant hammer-over-the-head schtick gets old quick. Meyer makes no effort toward subtlety, and doesn’t offer any fodder for thought. You don’t have sex until you are married and that’s it. No controversy. No other options. The few days before your honeymoon night you are supposed to go to your parents for a frank talk about sex, or “physical love” as main character Edward called it (in a preachy diatribe about how marital sex is the only sex. It’s one of many religious speeches the characters make throughout the book.).

I’m not taking issue with Meyer’s beliefs. She can believe what she wants. But I would like to have people realize what Meyer’s purpose was. And once you see it, the plot is overly predictable. Knowing that she was a Mormon, and reading the morality in the first two books, I knew a child was coming. I slightly wondered how she would do it, but I know enough about the Mormon religion to see that a child would appear as soon as the honeymoon was over. In the case of Bella, the fetus appeared after only two nights of marital conjugation.

The Work from my site, Purplecar.net:

The fact that the Twilight Series is a fantasy series about vampires doesn’t distract from the heavy religiosity throughout the entire 4-book story. The series serves only one purpose: to inculcate teens into a christian morality, preferably Mormon. Let’s not pretend otherwise.

Plus, the repetitive and overly simple writing and transparent plot don’t hold a candle (or a fang) to Harry Potter. Not even close. But that’s plain to anyone who reads the first page. I’ll talk about what must be the appeal at the end of the post. Right now let’s look at the morality messages that pelt you at every turn of the page.

[SPOILER ALERT: Plot is revealed.]

First, we repeatedly see Bella’s and Edward’s “struggle” with staying virgins until they marry. Then they marry at age 18 and 17, respectively, having a child immediately. Plain statements supporting a christian theology, the basic beliefs of the Mormon faith (or, perhaps any conservative christian religion) are clearly outlined in the books. After a while, it becomes clear to the aware reader that the series’ purpose is to spread conservative christian theology and moral beliefs through the teens of the world. The Mormon author of the series, Stephenie Meyer, knew what she was doing.

Unfortunately, the constant hammer-over-the-head schtick gets old quick. Meyer makes no effort toward subtlety, and doesn’t offer any fodder for thought. You don’t have sex until you are married and that’s it. No controversy. No other options. The few days before your honeymoon night you are supposed to go to your parents for a frank talk about sex, or “physical love” as main character Edward called it (in a preachy diatribe about how marital sex is the only sex. It’s one of many religious speeches the characters make throughout the book.).

I’m not taking issue with Meyer’s beliefs. She can believe what she wants. But I would like to have people realize what Meyer’s purpose was. And once you see it, the plot is overly predictable. Knowing that she was a Mormon, and reading the morality in the first two books, I knew a child was coming. I slightly wondered how she would do it, but I know enough about the Mormon religion to see that a child would appear as soon as the honeymoon was over. In the case of Bella, the fetus appeared after only two nights of marital conjugation.

In a side-by-side comparison, you will find that the posts are identical.

You did not receive permission from me to use the Work as the basis for “[title]” nor did you receive permission from me to make or distribute copies, including electronic copies, of same. Therefore, I believe you have willfully infringed my rights under 17 U.S.C. Section 101 et seq. and could be liable for statutory damages.

I demand that you immediately cease the use and distribution of all infringing works derived from the Work, and all copies, including electronic copies, of same, that you deliver to me, if applicable, all unused, undistributed copies of same, or destroy such copies immediately and that you desist from this or any other infringement of my rights in the future. If I have not received an affirmative response from you by [date give them about 2 weeks] indicating that you have fully complied with these requirements, I shall take further action against you.

You also appear to be in violation of Blogger.com/blogspot.com’s copyright policy. I have submitted a form to Google to bring their attention to your unauthorized use of my copyrighted work.

I have copied a Mr. [redacted] from Blogger.com/blogspot.com on this letter.

Christine Cavalier
christine [at] purplecar [dot] net

Comments on this entry are closed.

  • Joey Fortman 26 February 2010, 10:24 pm

    Wow!!! People actually DO THAT!?!?!?! What a bummer.

  • Benjamin Fryxell 14 March 2010, 9:57 am

    hahaha way to show ’em, Christine 😀

  • arvinlexor 8 April 2011, 3:42 am

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